A place you will not leave without a handful of earth




Photo: EPA / ADRIAN BRADSHAW

Photo: EPA / ADRIAN BRADSHAW

One of the treasures kept in the palace is a Buddhist scripture that Buddhists believe fell on the roof of the palace from heaven so that no one would read it then.

Located on top of a mountain Jormo Zhaxi Ceri on the east bank of the river Yarlung, Yumbulagang it is the first palace and one of the first buildings built in Tibet.

According to legend, it was built in the 2nd century BC, during the first Tibetan king Nyatri Tsenpa, and under the rule of the fifth Dalai Lama it became the monastery of the Gelugpa school..

The name palae means “mother and son,” and inside are murals vividly depicting the historical events and history of the first king of Tibet, as well as the first piece of arable land. Palau Yumbulagang it has two parts, the front is divided into several floors and the back is a square tower.

One of the treasures kept there is a Buddhist scripture that Buddhists believe fell on the roof of the palace from the sky and no one could read it then, but it will be deciphered later, when the time comes.

Statues can also be seen in the palace Thiesung Sangjie Buddha, King Nietzsche, the first king of Tibet, Songsten Gampo and other kings. The palace is occupied by eight workers who live there and protect it from thieves, so that history does not repeat itself: twenty years ago, thieves stole valuable statues.

Not far from the palace is a fertile valley that is considered the first cultivated field in Tibet. Farmers who visit the valley often take it with them a handful of earth to splash their fields when they return home, thus ensuring good performance.

From the city Tsetanga which goes to the palace is about 10 kilometers, and visitors can choose whether to go by taxi, motorbike or bicycle. Some even decide to stroll through the picturesque area.

If you wish taxi, you must tell the driver how long you will stay in the palace: it will take you at least an hour to see it, count the ten-minute climb to Yumbulagangu. The best time to travel is from June to August, when it is hot enough.



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